Bumpy Roman Roads

Ephesians 4:32

We left Puente La Reina under cloudy conditions with a slight drizzle. It got much better but it was windy and cold. Nonetheless, it was a good day to cover 22 km.

Despite the drizzle which soon let up, the conditions for photos were good. The first photos were taken along the main pilgrim road that has been there a 1000 years. I don’t think the geraniums are that old.

20130524-172251.jpg

20130524-172257.jpg

20130524-172305.jpg

20130524-172314.jpg

Finally reached the famous bridge built to protect pilgrims. Made sure we got shots from all angles.

20130524-172407.jpg

20130524-172416.jpg

20130524-172412.jpg

20130524-172421.jpg

Headed out of town on gentle ground surrounded by farmland. Had to climb into the town of Maneru. The picture of the noble crest on a house was the big status symbol back then.

20130524-172551.jpg

20130524-172558.jpg

20130524-172603.jpg

Another climb into a hill top village of Cirauqui. Ran into the Irish guys we met last night. Wasn’t the last time. I asked them if they left any beer in the village. To get through the place you needed to follow the arrows through buildings. Did not get lost. There was a stage venue for Burnt in a rather ancient plaza.

20130524-172939.jpg

20130524-172944.jpg

20130524-172949.jpg

20130524-172954.jpg

20130524-172958.jpg

Headed off to Lorca for lunch and crossed a medieval bridge and one built by the Romans that is still in use. It was at this time that we followed sections of Roman road. They dated from the first century BC so we should cut the highway maintenance some slack. It would have been one bumpy chariot ride. More likely the legions and merchants wagons probably thought they were much better than mud. The best part about the bumpy roads is that the mountain bikes avoided us all today. There were a bunch of spoke breakers on that section.

20130524-173648.jpg

20130524-173653.jpg

20130524-173657.jpg

20130524-173702.jpg

20130524-173712.jpg

Nice lunch at a bar in Lorca. Ran into several people we knew including the sausage man from France. Walked on to Villatuerta across some open country and through the modern town but crossed our last bridge for the day, almost.

20130524-173948.jpg

20130524-173954.jpg

20130524-174000.jpg

20130524-174005.jpg

We see Basque political statements in graffiti locations like under passes. Not sure why so many are in English. Let us just say that not all Basques are happy without their own country. Maybe we could give them Bakersfield.

Found our Pension after walking through most of Estella. It is still only fifty degrees but the sky is mostly blue and rain was not an issue today. Plan to take plenty of pictures on our way out of town tomorrow.

Time for editorials. We have seen some interesting phenomena over the last couple of days. Saw a guy with an umbrella instead of a poncho. The wind was blowing at least 40 mph. Also there is an Asian girl with a clear plastic umbrella. She looks cold. Just like the rest of us. Most interesting pack was a guy from Madagascar. I thought he might be a modern day samurai. He had a number of contraptions on the chest, the waist and on the pack. The total did not amount to much of a pack. Talked to him at a breakfast and he was enjoying his Camino.

The best was the group of very senior Seniors touring in the Casanova tour bus. The oxymorons kept building. The bus was owned by a Swiss company. The Swiss are watchmakers not matchmakers. They seemed to enjoy the help yourself to the wine deal at our buffet dinner. We did too. Evidently, they are on a tour of accessible sights on the Pilgrimage Route. Not a bad way to do it for some.

We also see people with packs that can only carry a coat and a bottle of water. There are tours that drop people off and pick them up after walking a little while,on the Camino. They advertise heavily on the web. Again, another way of doing the Camino.

Ran into the Irish boys in the bar where we were getting our daily Dave Sheff ration of beer. Ice cold in Spain. They advised us to not eat in the restaurant with the beer. When Irish complain about food, it must be bad. We will find another locale. There are plenty in this town that has been meeting the needs of pilgrims for a thousand years.

5 thoughts on “Bumpy Roman Roads

  1. So glad to see pictures again! Great bridges that have been there so long and still used. I like seeing the pictures of you two the best. You look happy and healthy. Matt and Lindsey driving up tonight. They are going to a wedding on Sat. Rob and a friend coming on Sun. He has Mon and Tues. off.

  2. I love to see the Roman bridges. And all the red geraniums. I wonder if the Romans had geraniums? Little-known historical fact. Maybe a lost one. It’s been cold here, too, so we are in sync with you.

  3. Hmmmm…so many cold, windy, rainy days. Bummer. So, I’m guessing you’re not worried about Global Warming right this moment? Just in case, I’ve sent my 2012 tax to IRS on time this year, to be apportioned out (my fair share) to all those alternative energy businesses( dare I say “oops” for some of them who’ve prematurely vanished?)…..so, you’re good to go……especially Globally. Carry on. (Let me know if it’s working). ;)- PS: I’ll be in SF for my summer grant trip early June….I think we’ll be in Rob’s neck of the woods for a tour/study. I know we’re “doing” Angel Island and some archival sites for research. I’ll check back with you on this.

  4. PPS: Didn’t Monet “do” that Pilgrim bridge? Or Manet….or Sisley? I’m still thinking Monet and I’m going to look it up. I’ve used it in my art classes before, teaching Impressionism….painted pretty much the exact angle in the 3rd bridge shot you posted. Ole!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s