Ice Out – Irish In

Most of the family ancestors from the British Isles are descendants of the Celts and Pre-Celtic populations. The reality that no records exist for these pre-historic folks need not prevent us from doing a little historical fiction. Besides, this provides an opportunity to go back to the Summer 2012 trip to the isles. I also need to interject that not all of the family ancestors were of purely Celtic stock. There were significant non-Celtic additions with the arrival of the Normans in 1066. Back to the beginnings.

As the ice retreated from the British Isles around 12,000 BC, a few thousand hunter-gatherers arrived and geneticists have determined that some 80% of modern inhabitants of the isles carry these genetics. Therefore, given that since both sides have numerous ancestors from the isles it is likely that we are also descendents of these early adapters to island life. I kind of like this idea since these “primitives” were contemporaries of the painters of Lascaux in the Dordogne region in France. We have had the privilege of seeing the original cave masterpieces on earlier trips to the region.

Around 9500 BC rising seas cut off Ireland from Britain which in turn was separated from the continent and the French around 6500 BC. Prior to the 4000 BC agricultural revolution in the isles, it is estimated that that Britain had 100,000 and Ireland 40,000 souls. This population had grown to a total of 2 million prior to the arrival of Celts. The Celts impose “political” control and merge with the pre-Celtic populations. What is astounding is organization and determination of these pre-Celtic populations of whom we have no written records and only inscriptions that can be interpreted  in almost any number of ways.

The meaning of the swirls is anyone's guess

The meaning of the swirls is anyone’s guess

The most impressive collection of surviving monuments include structures in the valley of the River Boyne lies New Grange. Archeologists have concluded that the structure is designed to give the souls of the departed an exit strategy . For 15 minutes the sun light penetrates to the inner chamber at the winter solstice. It is believed that the souls were at that point beamed up.

Evaluating the quality of stonework a New Grange c.3200 predating the pyramids.

Evaluating the quality of stonework a New Grange c.3200 predating the pyramids.

Now we know why Ireland is green

Now we know why Ireland is green. Peggy is trying to keep the grass dry.

Neolithic monuments like these, as well as Stonehenge, populate the countryside. In some locations the stones have been repurposed for farmer’s wall but an incredible number survive. Perhaps size does matter.

The Celtic arrivals create their own structures. The most impressive to us was the Dun Aengus fortification on Aran Island. Dating back to around 800 BC, the 11 acres of stonework is impressive. So is the view from the edge located 300 feet above the sea. Peggy loves to prod me into looking over cliffs and climbing towers.

Give me a 2500 year old rock doorway anytime.

Give me a 2500 year old rock doorway anytime.

This is not a good idea

This is not a good idea

She is taking pictures!

She is taking pictures!

Aran Island is reached by boat. People still farm this island with no native dirt. What they grow is grown from dirt that is the product of composting seaweed and sand. Tough life.

Celtic was society structured around family clans with a plethora of not so mighty rulers. In Ireland this pig pile of competing big shots could enjoy their rivalry unmolested by the outside. The Romans never bothered the Celts in Ireland. Different story in Britain.  The Roman invasions of the 1st Century led to the eventual incorporation of Celtic society of Romanized Britons into the empire for around four hundred years. Roman expansion ended where the island narrows near the border with modern Scotland. At this time the Scots were still in the process of migrating from Ireland to Scotland and land north of Hadrian’s Wall was dominated by the Picts. Not much is known about them except through the jaundiced writings of the Romans. Graffiti from a Roman fort on the wall sums up the situation, “If the Picts don’t get you, the weather will.”

Tourist resting at Roman Fort

Tourist resting at Roman Fort

Impressive collection of stone

Impressive collection of stone

Being on the edge of Europe had its advantages as the Roman era was closing in the British Isles. The Irish were beyond the reach of the Anglo-Saxon invaders who were giving King Arthur such a time. These Germans pushed the Celts to the western edge of the island,  Wales and Cornwall. Many of the Britons bailed and moved in such numbers that a peninsula in France is named after them, Brittany. These mythic days are memorialized in countless tales and in Glastonbury where Arthur and Guinevere are buried. At least that is what the sign says.

If the sign says it, it must be true.

If the sign says it, it must be true.

Homage to the King

Homage to the King

Meanwhile in Ireland, Patrick it is getting a license to preach the Gospel from the Irish High King on a hill in the Boyne Valley.

I think St. Patrick is holding the Shamrock, his teaching tool.

I think St. Patrick is holding the Shamrock, his teaching tool.

Church built to memorialize the site and honor Patrick

Church built to memorialize the site and honor Patrick

The High King and the lessers met on this hilltop hear Patrick's pitch

The High King and the lessers met on this hilltop to hear Patrick’s pitch

Irish missionaries were busy at this time converting the Angles, Saxon and Jutes. They were successful and Monastic communities were established on both islands. Unfortunately for the Monks, many of these locations provided easy access for the Vikings who were soon on the scene.

Next we will be back to the Vikings and their cousins, the Normans.

 

2 thoughts on “Ice Out – Irish In

  1. Thanks…I want to hear more, see more. My English/Irish ancestors were “really” Vikings who invaded (they were originally from Denmark)…in fact my “Hicks” line means in some Norse terms “he who lives out in the sticks, far, far away” (they went up the river to York) which is what we STILL might say today…..”He’s a Hick from the STICKS.” Language is history. Amazing. Likewise, my Swayne/Swain line (Sven) is from Denmark-migrated to England/Scotland/Ireland. Your photos are fabulous!!! Wish I were there!!!!

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